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Stopping Facial Bleeding

Overview

If emergency care is not needed, the following steps will protect the wound and protect you from another person's blood.

  1. Wash your hands well with soap and water, if available.
  2. Put on medical gloves before applying pressure to the wound.

    If gloves are not available, to apply pressure you can:

    • Use many layers of fabric, plastic bags, or whatever you have between your hands and the wound.
    • Have the person hold their own hand over the wound, if possible, and apply pressure and elevate the injured area.
    • Use your bare hands to apply pressure only as a last resort.
  3. Have the person lie down with their head elevated.
  4. Remove or cut clothing from around the wound.
  5. Remove any jewelry from the general area of the wound.
  6. Do not attempt to clean out the wound at this point.
  7. Press firmly on the facial wound with a clean cloth.
    • If you don't have a clean cloth, use the cleanest material available.
    • Do not press on an injured eye.
    • If you need to press on the neck or throat area to stop bleeding, be careful. Don't interfere with the person's breathing.
    • If there is an object in the wound, apply pressure around the object, not directly over it.
  8. Apply steady, direct pressure and elevate the area for a full 15 minutes.

    Use a clock to time the 15 minutes. It can seem like a long time. Resist the urge to peek after a few minutes to see whether bleeding has stopped. If blood soaks through the cloth, apply another one without lifting the first.

  9. If needed, continue direct pressure and get help.

    If moderate to severe bleeding has not slowed or stopped, continue direct pressure while getting help. Mild bleeding usually stops on its own or slows to an ooze or trickle after 15 minutes of pressure. It may ooze or trickle for up to 45 minutes. Do all you can to keep the wound clean and avoid further injury to the area.

  10. Watch for signs of shock.

Related Information

Credits

Current as of: March 9, 2022

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
William H. Blahd Jr. MD, FACEP - Emergency Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
David Messenger MD - Emergency Medicine, Critical Care Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine

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