Health Library

The Health Library is a collection of health and wellness resources created for learning and accessibility. Select a topic below for related health information or search for a topic in the search bar for more information on other medical conditions.

Vaccines and Immunizations

  • Immunizations help keep you and your child from getting a disease. They contain medicine that causes the body to make antibodies. These antibodies can then recognize and fight the disease if you or your child is later exposed to it. Immunizations...

  • After getting approval from several expert groups, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following immunization schedule for children. You can view it online at: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html

  • After getting approval from several expert groups, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following immunization schedule for children. You can view it online at: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html.

  • Some people question the safety of immunizations for children. Although minor discomfort sometimes follows vaccine injections, research does not support claims that immunizations put a child at any significant risk for harmful side effects. The U.S....

  • An overwhelming majority of health professionals, medical researchers, and professional medical organizations (such as the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Practice Physicians) recommend immunization. Getting...

  • What are immunizations? Immunizations save lives. They are the best way to help protect you or your child from certain infectious diseases. They also help reduce the spread of disease to others and prevent epidemics. Most are given as shots. They are sometimes called vaccines, or vaccinations. In many cases when you...

  • Short-term, mild reactions to immunizations are common. Immunizations that may cause a fever include: Diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (DTaP) or diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus (DPT). Babies can have a fever of up to 104 F (40 C) within 2 to 3 hours of getting the DTaP or DPT shot. Children may be fussy...

  • Routine immunizations Starting at 2 months after birth, premature infants need all the recommended immunizations that full-term infants get. The one immunization that your preemie may not get on schedule is the hepatitis B vaccine, which is usually given at birth. This vaccine doesn't work as well in very small...

  • There has been ongoing controversy surrounding certain vaccines and their relationship to autism. Some parents have been concerned that vaccines, specifically the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and preservatives used in other childhood vaccines, play a role in children developing autism. There have been a lot of...

  • My child's name is __________________________. My child's birthday is _________________. My child's doctor is __________________________. The doctor's phone number is _____________________. Age Immunization Dose Notes Date given Birth ...

  • After getting approval from several expert groups, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following immunization schedules: Childhood Immunization Schedule: Ages 0 to 6 Years Childhood Immunization Schedule: Ages 7 to 18 Years Adults ages...

  • After getting approval from several expert groups, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following immunization schedule for adults. You can view it online at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html.

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